Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in COVID-19 Disease: From Molecular Pathway to Vaccine Administration

Version 1 : Received: 2 June 2021 / Approved: 4 June 2021 / Online: 4 June 2021 (10:46:33 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Nappi, F.; Iervolino, A.; Avtaar Singh, S.S. COVID-19 Pathogenesis: From Molecular Pathway to Vaccine Administration. Biomedicines 2021, 9, 903. Nappi, F.; Iervolino, A.; Avtaar Singh, S.S. COVID-19 Pathogenesis: From Molecular Pathway to Vaccine Administration. Biomedicines 2021, 9, 903.

Journal reference: Biomedicines 2021, 9, 903
DOI: 10.3390/biomedicines9080903

Abstract

The Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a global pandemic that has affected millions of people worldwide. The advent of vaccines, however, has permitted some restitution. Aside from the respiratory complications of the infection, there is also a thrombotic risk attributed to both the disease alongside the vaccine. There are no reliable data for the risk of thromboembolism in SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients managed out with the hospital setting. A literature review was performed to identify the pathophysiological mechanism of thrombosis from the SARS-CoV-2 infection including the role of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme receptors. The impact of the vaccine and likely mechanisms from thrombosis following vaccination was also clarified. Finally, the utility of the vaccines available against the multiple variants is also highlighted. The systemic response to SARS-CoV-2 infection is still relatively poorly understood, but several risk factors have been identified. The roll-out of the vaccines worldwide has also allowed the lifting of lockdown measures and a reduction in the spread of the disease. The experience of the SARS-CoV-2 infection, however, has highlighted the crucial role of epidemiological research and the need for ongoing studies within this field.

Keywords

Arterial and Venous Thrombosis; COVID-19 disease; SARS-CoV-2 infection; vaccines

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