Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Land Degradation Neutrality Assessment using Geospatial Techniques in North Wello Zone, Northern Ethiopia

Version 1 : Received: 28 May 2021 / Approved: 31 May 2021 / Online: 31 May 2021 (13:29:58 CEST)

How to cite: Zeleke, G.; Zeleke, M.T.; Mersha, L.A. Land Degradation Neutrality Assessment using Geospatial Techniques in North Wello Zone, Northern Ethiopia. Preprints 2021, 2021050775 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0775.v1). Zeleke, G.; Zeleke, M.T.; Mersha, L.A. Land Degradation Neutrality Assessment using Geospatial Techniques in North Wello Zone, Northern Ethiopia. Preprints 2021, 2021050775 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0775.v1).

Abstract

Land degradation a serious and nationwide environmental concern in Ethiopia. The problem is its iterative relationship between land degradation, climate change, and agriculture, exacerbating one another via negative and positive feedback loops. Due to the need for an efficient response to land degradation in the country, different sustainable land management practices have been implemented since the late 1980s. The objective of this study was to analyze land degradation neutrality status using remote sensing data in the study area. We have studied the land degradation neutrality conditions of the North Wello Zone by using indicators data, namely land cover change, land productivity dynamics, and soil organic carbon stock. The result shows that the settlement areas consistently expanded at the fifth speed (2010-2018) from 1995 to 2010. Between 1995 and 2010, forestland declined by 18 percent, while an increasing trend of 26.8 percent from 2010 to 2018. The assessment results also indicate that 52.8 percent of the total area is stable and characterized by less stressed land productivity. The soil organic carbon is comparatively abundant in the high and midland vegetation areas but very thin in lowland areas. Most of the highland and midland parts of the study areas are in the conditions of stable and increasing land productivity with high biomass and soil organic content. However, most lowland areas showed a decline in land productivity conditions.

Subject Areas

Land Degradation; Land Productivity Dynamics; Vegetation Cover Change; Soil Organic Carbon

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