Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Contribution of Epigenetic Inheritance Processes on Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease

Version 1 : Received: 23 May 2021 / Approved: 25 May 2021 / Online: 25 May 2021 (08:37:15 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Bellver-Sanchis, A.; Pallàs, M.; Griñán-Ferré, C. The Contribution of Epigenetic Inheritance Processes on Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease. Epigenomes 2021, 5, 15. Bellver-Sanchis, A.; Pallàs, M.; Griñán-Ferré, C. The Contribution of Epigenetic Inheritance Processes on Age-Related Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease. Epigenomes 2021, 5, 15.

Journal reference: Epigenomes 2021, 5, 15
DOI: 10.3390/epigenomes5020015

Abstract

During the last years, epigenetic processes have emerged as important factors for many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s diseases (AD). These complex diseases seem to have a heritable component; however, genome-wide association studies failed to identify the genetic loci involved in the eatiology. So, how can these changes be transmitted from one gen-eration to the next? Answering this question would allow us to understand how the environ-ment can affect human populations for multiple generations and explain the high prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD. This review pays particular attention to the relationship among epigenetics, cognition, and neurodegeneration across generations, deepening the under-standing of the relevance of heritability in neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, we highlight some recent examples of EI induced by experiences, focusing on their contribution of processes in learning and memory, to point out new targets for therapeutic interventions. Here, we first describe the prominent role of epigenetic factors in memory processing. Then, we briefly discuss aspects of EI. And ends, we summarize evidence of how epigenetic marks inherited by experi-ence and/or environmental stimuli contribute to cognitive status offspring, since better knowledge of EI can provide clues in the appearance and development of age-related cognitive decline and AD.

Subject Areas

epigenetic mechanisms; learning process; memory formation; cognitive decline; intergenerational epigenetic inheritance; transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, AD

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.