Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

ISIDOG Consensus Guidelines on Covid-19 Vaccination for Women before, during and after Pregnancy

Version 1 : Received: 19 April 2021 / Approved: 20 April 2021 / Online: 20 April 2021 (11:22:31 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Donders, G.G.G.; Grinceviciene, S.; Haldre, K.; Lonnee-Hoffmann, R.; Donders, F.; Tsiakalos, A.; Adriaanse, A.; Martinez de Oliveira, J.; Ault, K.; Mendling, W.; on the behalf of the COVID-19 ISIDOG Guideline Group. ISIDOG Consensus Guidelines on COVID-19 Vaccination for Women before, during and after Pregnancy. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2902. Donders, G.G.G.; Grinceviciene, S.; Haldre, K.; Lonnee-Hoffmann, R.; Donders, F.; Tsiakalos, A.; Adriaanse, A.; Martinez de Oliveira, J.; Ault, K.; Mendling, W.; on the behalf of the COVID-19 ISIDOG Guideline Group. ISIDOG Consensus Guidelines on COVID-19 Vaccination for Women before, during and after Pregnancy. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2902.

Journal reference: J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2902
DOI: 10.3390/jcm10132902

Abstract

Introduction.Sars-CoV-2 infection poses particular problems in pregnancy, as the infection more frequently causes severe complications than in unaffected pregnant women, or non-pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Now that vaccination is available and rapidly getting implemented worldwide, the question arises whether pregnant women should be vaccinated, and if so, whether they should get priority. Methods. Available scientific data and available guidelines about vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 were collected by the Guideline Committee of the International Society of Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISIDOG), and were analyzed, discussed and summarized as guidelines for health care workers caring for pregnant women. Concluding statements were graded according to the Oxford Evidence Based Medicine Grading System. Results. There is evidence to consider pregnancy as a risk factor for serious complications of COVID-19 infection, even in the absence of additional risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity which increase these risks even more in pregnancy. Currently available data slightly favor mRNA-based vaccines above vector-based vaccines during pregnancy and breastfeeding, until more safety data become available. Conclusion. ISIDOG advices policy makers and societies to prioritize pregnant women to receive vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, and favor the mRNA vaccines until further safety information becomes available.

Keywords

vaccine, pregnancy complication, SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, maternal complications, pandemic, prevention, safety

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Allergology

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