Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Factors Influencing Initiation and Discontinuation of Vitamin D Supplementation Among Infants

Version 1 : Received: 17 April 2021 / Approved: 19 April 2021 / Online: 19 April 2021 (13:25:55 CEST)

How to cite: HURMUZLU KOZLER, S.; SAYLI, T.R. Factors Influencing Initiation and Discontinuation of Vitamin D Supplementation Among Infants. Preprints 2021, 2021040487 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0487.v1). HURMUZLU KOZLER, S.; SAYLI, T.R. Factors Influencing Initiation and Discontinuation of Vitamin D Supplementation Among Infants. Preprints 2021, 2021040487 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0487.v1).

Abstract

Background: To determine vitamin D supplementation frequency among infants, factors that influence adherence, and reasons for discontinuation of initiated vitamin D. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire administered to the mothers via a face-to-face interview on 560 infants aged from 1 to 24 months admitted to outpatient clinics from June to December 2017. Results: A total of 351 infants were administered vitamin D, and the rate of supplementation in the first year of life was 83%, while it was only 28% between 13 and 24 months. The rate of vitamin D supplementation was higher among infants who were exclusively formula-fed (p<.05). When the data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis, only visit family physicians seems to be a statistically significant independent variable in increasing supplementation (p<.05). Compared with family refusal, the rate of discontinuation of vitamin D by the healthcare providers was higher after the first year of life (p<.05). The rates of vitamin D discontinuation by healthcare providers, especially by nurses who considered the duration of supplementation adequate, were statistically significantly higher when compared with the fontanel closure and other reasons (p<0.05). Conclusions: The rate of vitamin D supplementation was higher among families who visited family physicians, which suggests the importance of well-baby visits. Since vitamin D supplementation was less common among exclusively breastfed infants, mothers should be educated. Healthcare professionals need further education about the importance of vitamin D supplementation and indications for discontinuation.

Keywords

adherence; healthcare providers; infant; Vitamin D; supplementation

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