Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Effects of Group Art Therapy on the Primary Family Caregivers of Hospitalized Patients with Brain Injuries in South Korea

Version 1 : Received: 14 April 2021 / Approved: 15 April 2021 / Online: 15 April 2021 (15:16:51 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kim, N.; Kim, S.-J.; Jeong, G.-H.; Oh, Y.; Jang, H.; Kim, A.-L. The Effects of Group Art Therapy on the Primary Family Caregivers of Hospitalized Patients with Brain Injuries in South Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5000. Kim, N.; Kim, S.-J.; Jeong, G.-H.; Oh, Y.; Jang, H.; Kim, A.-L. The Effects of Group Art Therapy on the Primary Family Caregivers of Hospitalized Patients with Brain Injuries in South Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5000.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5000
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18095000

Abstract

This study examined the effects of group art therapy on depression, burden, and self-efficacy in primary family caregivers of patients with brain injuries. This was a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group and a pre- and post-test design. This study was carried out in one national rehabilitation hospital targeting 41 primary family caregivers of patients with brain injuries. Group art therapy intervention was carried out three days per week for 12 times over four consecutive weeks. The experimental group (n = 20) received group art therapy, whereas the control group (n = 21) did not. We used a time difference method to minimize the risk of contaminating the control group by sampling sequentially. The experimental group showed a significantly greater decrease in burden (t = 2.462, p = 0.020) and significantly greater improvement in self-efficacy (t = −6.270, p < 0.001) than the control group. Group art therapy may be an effective nursing intervention for primary family caregivers of patients with brain injuries.

Subject Areas

art therapy; brain injuries; caregivers; depression; self-efficacy

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