Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Rectus Femoris Mmimicking Ultrasound Phantom for Muscle Mass Assessment: Design, Research, and Training Application

Version 1 : Received: 10 April 2021 / Approved: 12 April 2021 / Online: 12 April 2021 (12:50:45 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Nakanishi, N.; Inoue, S.; Tsutsumi, R.; Akimoto, Y.; Ono, Y.; Kotani, J.; Sakaue, H.; Oto, J. Rectus Femoris Mimicking Ultrasound Phantom for Muscle Mass Assessment: Design, Research, and Training Application. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2721. Nakanishi, N.; Inoue, S.; Tsutsumi, R.; Akimoto, Y.; Ono, Y.; Kotani, J.; Sakaue, H.; Oto, J. Rectus Femoris Mimicking Ultrasound Phantom for Muscle Mass Assessment: Design, Research, and Training Application. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2721.

Journal reference: J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2721
DOI: 10.3390/jcm10122721

Abstract

Ultrasound has become widely used as a mean to measure the rectus femoris muscle in the acute and chronic phase of critical illness. Despite its noninvasiveness and accessibility, its accuracy highly depends on the skills of the technician. However, few ultrasound phantoms for the confirmation of its accuracy or to improve technical skills exist. In this study, we created a novel phantom model and used it for investigating the accuracy of measurements and for training. Study 1 investigated how various conditions affect ultrasound measurements such as thickness, cross-sectional area, and echogenicity. Study 2 investigated if the phantom can be used for training of various health care providers in vitro and vivo. Study 1 showed that thickness, cross-sectional area, and echogenicity were affected by probe compression strength, probe angle, phantom compression, and varying equipment. Study 2 in vitro showed that using the phantom for training improved the accuracy of the measurements taken within phantom, and Study 2 in vivo showed the phantom training had a short-term effect on improving the measurement accuracy in a human volunteer. The new ultrasound phantom model revealed that various conditions affected ultrasound measurements, and phantom training improved the measurement accuracy.

Keywords

Ultrasound; phantom; rectus femoris muscle; echogenicity; training

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