Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Frail Males on the American Frontier: The Role of Environmental Harshness on Sex Ratios at Birth Across a Period of Rapid Industrialization

Version 1 : Received: 2 April 2021 / Approved: 5 April 2021 / Online: 5 April 2021 (12:19:57 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 5 April 2021 / Approved: 6 April 2021 / Online: 6 April 2021 (14:57:54 CEST)

How to cite: Schacht, R.; Hollingshaus, M.; Bruckner, T.; Macfarlan, S.J.; Tharp, D.; Hanson, H.; Smith, K.R. Frail Males on the American Frontier: The Role of Environmental Harshness on Sex Ratios at Birth Across a Period of Rapid Industrialization. Preprints 2021, 2021040116 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0116.v1). Schacht, R.; Hollingshaus, M.; Bruckner, T.; Macfarlan, S.J.; Tharp, D.; Hanson, H.; Smith, K.R. Frail Males on the American Frontier: The Role of Environmental Harshness on Sex Ratios at Birth Across a Period of Rapid Industrialization. Preprints 2021, 2021040116 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0116.v1).

Abstract

While sex ratios at birth (SRB) have been shown to vary within and across populations, after over a century of research, explanations have remained elusive. A variety of ecological, demographic, economic, and social variables have been evaluated, yet their association with SRB has been equivocal. Here, in an attempt to shed light on this unresolved topic within the literature, we approach the question of what drives variation in SRB using detailed longitudinal data spanning the frontier-era to the early 20th century in a US population. Using several measures of environmental harshness, we find that fewer boys are born during challenging times. However, these results hold only for the frontier-era and not into a period of rapid industrialization. We argue that the mixed state of the literature may result from the impact and frequency of exogenous stressors being dampened in post-industrial societies.

Subject Areas

sex ratio; prenatal stress; demography; ecological stress

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.