Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Adverse Childhood Experiences Combined with Emotional and Physical Abuse by the Partner Predict Antenatal Depression.

Version 1 : Received: 25 March 2021 / Approved: 26 March 2021 / Online: 26 March 2021 (14:18:14 CET)

How to cite: Abe, Y.; Sirichokchatchawan, W.; Sangkomkamhang, U.; Satthapisit, S.; Maes, M. Adverse Childhood Experiences Combined with Emotional and Physical Abuse by the Partner Predict Antenatal Depression.. Preprints 2021, 2021030669 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0669.v1). Abe, Y.; Sirichokchatchawan, W.; Sangkomkamhang, U.; Satthapisit, S.; Maes, M. Adverse Childhood Experiences Combined with Emotional and Physical Abuse by the Partner Predict Antenatal Depression.. Preprints 2021, 2021030669 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0669.v1).

Abstract

Background: Few studies examined the contributions of childhood adversities, intimate partner violence and social support to antenatal depression (AD). This study aims to 1) evaluate association of these psychosocial factors with AD symptoms in early pregnancy; and 2) examine the mediating effect of social support on the relationship between psychosocial stressors and AD symptoms.Methods: Participants were 120 pregnant women aged from 18 to 49 in less than 16 gestational weeks and attending at Antenatal Care Center at Khon Kaen hospital, Thailand. AD symptoms were assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Childhood adversities, intimate partner violence and social support were measured using the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire (ACE questionnaire), Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS), and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Results: We found that the EPDS score was significantly and positively associated with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and negatively with social support. Partial Least Square analysis showed that 49.1% of the variance in the depressive subdomain of the EPDS score was predicted by ACEs, namely psychological and physical abuse and neglect, emotional or physical abuse by the partner, unplanned pregnancy, and no satisfaction with their relationship. The effects of adverse childhood experience due to neglect on the EDPS score was mediated by social support by friends. Limitations: ACEs were assessed retrospectively and, therefore, may be susceptible to recall bias.Conclusion: Prenatal depression scores are to a large extent predicted by psychological distress as indicated by early lifetime trauma, abuse by partner, relation satisfaction, and implications of unintended pregnancy.

Keywords

Antenatal depression; Adverse childhood experiences; intimate partner violence; social support

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