Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Application of Molecular Hydrogen as an Antioxidant in Responses to Ventilatory and Ergogenic Adjustments during Incremental Exercise in Humans

Version 1 : Received: 24 December 2020 / Approved: 25 December 2020 / Online: 25 December 2020 (14:13:30 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Alharbi, A.A.D.; Ebine, N.; Nakae, S.; Hojo, T.; Fukuoka, Y. Application of Molecular Hydrogen as an Antioxidant in Responses to Ventilatory and Ergogenic Adjustments during Incremental Exercise in Humans. Nutrients 2021, 13, 459. Alharbi, A.A.D.; Ebine, N.; Nakae, S.; Hojo, T.; Fukuoka, Y. Application of Molecular Hydrogen as an Antioxidant in Responses to Ventilatory and Ergogenic Adjustments during Incremental Exercise in Humans. Nutrients 2021, 13, 459.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2021, 13, 459
DOI: 10.3390/nu13020459

Abstract

We investigated effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) supplementation on acid-base status, pulmonary gas exchange responses, and local muscle oxygenation during incremental exercise. Eighteen healthy, trained subjects in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design received H2-rich calcium powder (HCP) (1500 mg/day, containing 2.544 µg/day of H2) or H2-depleted placebo (1500 mg/day) for 3 consecutive days. They performed cycling incremental exercise starting at 20-watts work rate, increasing by 20 watts/2 min until exhaustion. Breath-by-breath pulmonary ventilation (VE) and CO2 output (VCO2) were measured and muscle deoxygenation (deoxy[Hb + Mb]) was determined via time-resolved-NIRS in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF). Blood gases' pH, lactate, and HCO3− concentrations were measured at rest and 120-, 200-, and 240-watt work rates. At rest, the HCP group had significantly lower VE, VCO2, and higher HCO3−, PCO2 versus placebo. During exercise, a significant pH decrease and greater HCO3− continued until 240-watts work rate in HCP. The VE was significantly lower in HCP versus placebo, but HCP did not affect the gas exchange status of VCO2 or oxygen uptake (VO2). HCP increased absolute values of deoxy[Hb + Mb] at the RF but not VL. Thus, HCP-induced hypoventilation would lead to lower pH and secondarily impaired balance between O2 delivery and utilization in the local RF during exercise, suggesting that HCP supplementation, which increases the at-rest antioxidant potential, affects the lower ventilation and pH status during incremental exercise. HPC induced a significantly lower O2 delivery/utilization ratio in the RF but not the VL, which may be because these regions possess inherently different vascular/metabolic control properties, perhaps related to fiber-type composition.

Keywords

hydrogen supplement; acid status; muscle deoxygenation; ventilation; incremental exercise

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