Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Prevalence of Co-Infections With Respiratory Viruses in Individuals Investigated for Sars-Cov-2 in Ontario, Canada

Version 1 : Received: 8 December 2020 / Approved: 10 December 2020 / Online: 10 December 2020 (12:53:28 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Peci, A.; Tran, V.; Guthrie, J.L.; Li, Y.; Nelson, P.; Schwartz, K.L.; Eshaghi, A.; Buchan, S.A.; Gubbay, J.B. Prevalence of Co-Infections with Respiratory Viruses in Individuals Investigated for SARS-CoV-2 in Ontario, Canada. Viruses 2021, 13, 130. Peci, A.; Tran, V.; Guthrie, J.L.; Li, Y.; Nelson, P.; Schwartz, K.L.; Eshaghi, A.; Buchan, S.A.; Gubbay, J.B. Prevalence of Co-Infections with Respiratory Viruses in Individuals Investigated for SARS-CoV-2 in Ontario, Canada. Viruses 2021, 13, 130.

Journal reference: Viruses 2021, 13, 130
DOI: 10.3390/v13010130

Abstract

Background: Co-infections of SARS-CoV-2 with respiratory viruses, bacteria and fungi have been reported to cause a wide range of illness. Objectives: We asses s the prevalence of co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 with seasonal respiratory viruses, document the respiratory viruses detected among individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2, and describe characteristics of individuals with respiratory virus co-infection detected. Methods: Specimens included in this study were submitted as part of routine clinical testing to Public Health Ontario Laboratory from individuals requiring testing for SARS-CoV-2 and/or seasonal respiratory viruses. Results: Co-infection was detected in a smaller proportion (2.5%) of individuals with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 than those with seasonal respiratory viruses (4.3%); this difference was not significant. Individuals with any respiratory virus co-infection were more likely to be younger than 65 years of age and male than those with single infection. Those with SARS-CoV-2 co-infection manifested mostly mild respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Findings of this study may not support routine testing for seasonal respiratory viruses among all individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2, as they were rare during the study period nor associated with severe disease. However, testing for seasonal respiratory viruses should be performed in severely ill individuals, in which detection of other viruses may assist with patient management.

Subject Areas

co-infection; SARS-CoV-2; Covid-19; seasonal respiratory viruses

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