Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Depression, Loneliness, Activities of Daily Living, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction in Older Adults at High-Risk for Dementia

Version 1 : Received: 26 October 2020 / Approved: 27 October 2020 / Online: 27 October 2020 (07:55:52 CET)

How to cite: Kim, S.; Son, H.; Choe, K.; Lee, K. Depression, Loneliness, Activities of Daily Living, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction in Older Adults at High-Risk for Dementia. Preprints 2020, 2020100536 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0536.v1). Kim, S.; Son, H.; Choe, K.; Lee, K. Depression, Loneliness, Activities of Daily Living, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction in Older Adults at High-Risk for Dementia. Preprints 2020, 2020100536 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0536.v1).

Abstract

As the number of older adults with dementia increases, early diagnosis and intervention are crucially important. The purpose of this study was to conduct dementia screening on older adults to determine whether there are differences in daily activities of living, depression, loneliness, social support, and life satisfaction between older adults at high-risk for dementia compared with low-risk older adults. We hypothesized a negative relationship between high-risk older adults and these factors. This study also hypothesized a moderating effect for social support on the relationship between daily living activities and life satisfaction. This study used a cross-sectional design with survey data. Participants were recruited at 15 public community health centers in South Korea. A total of 609 older adults (male 208, female 401) living in the community were screened for early dementia, and 113 participants (18.9 %) were assigned to the high-risk group. As hypothesized, participants in the high-risk group showed significantly more negative results ​​in terms of activities of daily living, depression, loneliness, social support, and life satisfaction compared with participants in the low-risk group. The findings of this study provide a theoretical basis for the importance of early screening for dementia and policies for effective dementia prevention.

Subject Areas

dementia; depression; loneliness; activities of daily living; social support; life satisfaction

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