Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Calculating Printing Speed for Polylactic Acid/Continuous Glass Fiber Composites via Fused Filament Fabrication

Version 1 : Received: 12 October 2020 / Approved: 13 October 2020 / Online: 13 October 2020 (09:40:25 CEST)

How to cite: Akhoundi, B.; Nabipour, M.; Kordi, O.; Hajami, F.; S. Band, S.; Mosavi, A. Calculating Printing Speed for Polylactic Acid/Continuous Glass Fiber Composites via Fused Filament Fabrication. Preprints 2020, 2020100266 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0266.v1). Akhoundi, B.; Nabipour, M.; Kordi, O.; Hajami, F.; S. Band, S.; Mosavi, A. Calculating Printing Speed for Polylactic Acid/Continuous Glass Fiber Composites via Fused Filament Fabrication. Preprints 2020, 2020100266 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0266.v1).

Abstract

In this study, a novel task of printing speed optimization for continuous fiber composites is investigated. Using continuous fibers is an innovative approach to reinforce products made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) additive manufacturing (AM) technology. In the printing process of composites with continuous fibers, the printing speed is critical because of its significant effect on the geometric shape of the samples, especially their corners. During optimization in this research, continuous glass fiber (CGF) and polylactic acid (PLA) filaments were utilized as reinforcing phase and matrix, respectively, and were simultaneously fed into the extrusion-based polymer 3D printer to form PLA/CGF composites. The optimization was carried out by calculating the temperature changes of the deposited rasters in the presence and absence of fibers as a first step and then determining the special relationship between the printing speeds and rasters temperature changes. Finally, the optimal and the maximum printing speed was computed based on a hypothesis, which is proved by the results of high-quality printed composites with different geometric shapes.

Subject Areas

optimization; extrusion-based additive manufacturing; 3d printer; continuous fibers

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