Preprint Brief Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Accuracy Validation of FireFACE Software in Analyzing Facial Expressions of Urban Forest Visitors

Version 1 : Received: 12 October 2020 / Approved: 13 October 2020 / Online: 13 October 2020 (09:31:06 CEST)

How to cite: Wei, H.; Liu, P. The Accuracy Validation of FireFACE Software in Analyzing Facial Expressions of Urban Forest Visitors. Preprints 2020, 2020100265 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0265.v1). Wei, H.; Liu, P. The Accuracy Validation of FireFACE Software in Analyzing Facial Expressions of Urban Forest Visitors. Preprints 2020, 2020100265 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0265.v1).

Abstract

The construction of sustainable urban forests follows the principle that well-being in people is promoted when exposed to tree population. Facial expression is the direct representation of inner emotion that can be used to assess real-time perception in urban forests. The emergence and change of facial expressions for forest visitors are in an implicit process. The reserved character of oriental races strengthens the requirement for the accuracy to recognize expressions through instrument rating. In this study, a dataset was established with 2,886 randomly photographed faces from visitors in a constructed urban forest park and a promenade at summertime in Shenyang City at Northeast China. Six experts were invited to choose 160 photos in total with 20 images representing one of eight typical expressions as angry, contempt, disgusted, happy, neutral, sad, scared, and surprised emotions. The FireFACE ver. 3.0 software was used to test hit-ratio validation as the accuracy (ac.) to match machine-recognized photos with those identified by experts. According to Kruskal-Wallis test on the difference from averaged scores in 20 recently published papers, contempt (ac.=0.40%, P=0.0038) and scared (ac.=25.23%, P=0.0018) expressions cannot pass the validation test. Therefore, the FireFACE can be used as an instrument to analyze facial expression from oriental people in urban forests but contempt and scared expressions cannot be identified.

Subject Areas

urban greenspace; sustainable city; urban forest management; psychological well-being; mental health; stress relief

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