Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Water Literacy: A Case Study of Semende and Palembang Students

Version 1 : Received: 8 October 2020 / Approved: 9 October 2020 / Online: 9 October 2020 (13:02:54 CEST)

How to cite: meilinda, M.; Nazip, K.; Anggraini, N.; Riyanto, R. The Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Water Literacy: A Case Study of Semende and Palembang Students. Preprints 2020, 2020100202 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0202.v1). meilinda, M.; Nazip, K.; Anggraini, N.; Riyanto, R. The Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Water Literacy: A Case Study of Semende and Palembang Students. Preprints 2020, 2020100202 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0202.v1).

Abstract

Water literacy is the ability to feel familiar with and get actively involved in water to face issues about it. This study aims to analyze the water literacy of students who come from areas that have indigenous knowledge related to water conservation and do not have indigenous knowledge but have come from the same province with a similar abundance of water. The samples of this study were 439 people consisting of 184 boys and 255 girls aged 11-18 years from junior and senior high school students in Palembang Municipality and three sub-districts in Muara Enim Regency, namely Semende Darat Laut, Semende Darat Tengah, and Darat Ulu and both are indonesian. There were 39 questions for measuring water literacy in the form of a Likert scale (1-5) to measure practical and living literacy with Cronbach alpha values of 0.692 and 0.773, respectively, and were analyzed with SPSS version 21 through the Mann-Whitney (u) and Cronbach alpha statistical tests. The total alpha was 0.838. Social literacy was measured in the open-ended question instrument and analyzed descriptively. The results showed that practical water literacy in Palembang was significantly different from Semende's but not with living water literacy. Students' social water literacy in the Semende had two different answer patterns, while, in Palembang, it was more diverse with six different response patterns. Meanwhile, when asked to describe a diagram of the flow of water in nature in Semende, no students think that it is the neglect of customs that results in reduced water in Semende as understood by some students in Palembang who are not involved with these customs.

Subject Areas

Indigenous knowledge; water literacy; students

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