Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Immersive Virtual Reality as Analgesia During Dressing Changes of Hospitalized Children and Adolescents with Burns: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 1 October 2020 / Approved: 2 October 2020 / Online: 2 October 2020 (15:29:05 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lauwens, Y.; Rafaatpoor, F.; Corbeel, K.; Broekmans, S.; Toelen, J.; Allegaert, K. Immersive Virtual Reality as Analgesia during Dressing Changes of Hospitalized Children and Adolescents with Burns: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis. Children 2020, 7, 194. Lauwens, Y.; Rafaatpoor, F.; Corbeel, K.; Broekmans, S.; Toelen, J.; Allegaert, K. Immersive Virtual Reality as Analgesia during Dressing Changes of Hospitalized Children and Adolescents with Burns: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis. Children 2020, 7, 194.

Journal reference: Children 2020, 7, 194
DOI: 10.3390/children7110194

Abstract

Children and adolescents with severe burns require dressing changes, associated with pain. As immersive virtual reality (VR) gained prominence as non-pharmacological adjuvant analgesia, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of full immersive VR on pain experienced during dressing changes in hospitalized children and adolescents with severe burns. This exercise included quality and risk of bias assessment. The systematic reviewsearch resulted in eight studies and 142 patients. This exercise included quality and risk of bias assessment. Due to missing data, four studies were excluded from the meta-analysis. Fixed effects meta-analysis of the four included studies (n = 104) revealed a large effect size (ES) (SMD=0.94; 95% CI=0.62, 1.27; Z=5.70; p<0.00001) for adjuvant full immersive VR compared to standard care. In conclusion, adjuvant full immersive VR significantly reduces pain experienced during dressing changes in children and adolescents with burns. We therefore recommend implementing full immersive VR as an adjuvant in this specific setting and population. However, this requires further research into the hygienic use of VR appliances in health institutions. Furthermore, due to the high cost of the hardware, a cost-benefit analysis is required. Finally, research should also verify the long term physical and psychological benefits of VR.

Subject Areas

children; adolescents; burns; dressing changes; virtual reality; pain.

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