Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Response of Malaria Hazard and Risk to a Hydroelectric Dam in Ethiopia Using GIS and Remote Sensing

Version 1 : Received: 25 September 2020 / Approved: 26 September 2020 / Online: 26 September 2020 (14:41:53 CEST)

How to cite: Smith, A.; Sim, S. Response of Malaria Hazard and Risk to a Hydroelectric Dam in Ethiopia Using GIS and Remote Sensing. Preprints 2020, 2020090641 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0641.v1). Smith, A.; Sim, S. Response of Malaria Hazard and Risk to a Hydroelectric Dam in Ethiopia Using GIS and Remote Sensing. Preprints 2020, 2020090641 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0641.v1).

Abstract

Malaria is a disease spread by female mosquitos of the Anopheles genus. It is acutely prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa, where 90% of malaria deaths occur annually. One Sub-Saharan African country historically impacted by malaria is Ethiopia. In the past twenty years, malaria prevalence has decreased throughout Sub-Saharan Africa; yet, anthropogenic environmental changes are changing the landscape of malaria. Scholarly literature has cited a positive relationship between hydroelectric dams and malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ethiopia is currently expanding their hydroelectric infrastructure. The Gilgel Gibe III Dam is located on the Omo River in Southwestern Ethiopia. It began generating electricity in 2015 and its reservoir has a capacity of 14,700 million m3 of water. This research utilized Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing to identify populations at an increased risk of malaria due to Gilgel Gibe III Dam. Two different techniques were employed: the proximity approach and the remote sensing approach. The proximity approach was based on distance from the reservoir. It identified all populations living within three kilometers of the reservoir as being at an increased risk. The remote sensing approach evaluated the slope, elevation, water content, and land surface temperature of the study area to create a mosquito breeding habitat risk map. Then, populations living within three kilometers of the two main High-Risk areas were identified. This study suggests that mosquito breeding habitat risk is not equally distributed throughout the Gilgel Gibe III Reservoir. This causes certain populations to be at a heightened risk of malaria.

Subject Areas

Malaria; Risk Maps; Remote Sensing; Ethiopia; Hydroelectric Dams

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.