Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Engineering Novel Epitope-Based Subunit Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 by Exploring the Immunoinformatics Approach

Version 1 : Received: 25 September 2020 / Approved: 26 September 2020 / Online: 26 September 2020 (13:01:26 CEST)

How to cite: Sarkar, B.; Ullah, M.A.; Araf, Y.; Rahman, M.S. Engineering Novel Epitope-Based Subunit Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 by Exploring the Immunoinformatics Approach. Preprints 2020, 2020090631 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0631.v1). Sarkar, B.; Ullah, M.A.; Araf, Y.; Rahman, M.S. Engineering Novel Epitope-Based Subunit Vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 by Exploring the Immunoinformatics Approach. Preprints 2020, 2020090631 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0631.v1).

Abstract

As the number of infections and deaths caused by the recent COVID-19 pandemic is increasing dramatically day-by-day, scientists are rushing towards developing possible counter-measures to fight the deadly virus, SARS-CoV-2. Although many efforts have already been put forward for designing and developing potential vaccines, however, most of them are proved to possess negative consequences. Therefore, in this study, the methods of immunoinformatics were exploited to design novel epitope-based subunit vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2, targeting four essential proteins of the virus i.e., spike glycoprotein, nucleocapsid phosphoprotein, membrane glycoprotein, and envelope protein. The highly antigenic, non-allergenic, non-toxic, non-human homolog and 100% conserved (across other isolates from different regions of the world) epitopes were used for constructing the vaccine. In total, fourteen CTL epitopes and eighteen HTL epitopes were used to construct the vaccine. Thereafter, several in silico validations i.e., the molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation (including the RMSF and RMSD studies), and immune simulation studies were also performed which predicted that the designed vaccine should be quite safe, effective, and stable within the biological environment. Finally, in silico cloning and codon adaptation studies were also conducted to design an effective mass production strategy of the vaccine. However, more in vivo and in vitro studies are required on the predicted vaccine to finally validate its safety and efficacy.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; In silico; Immunoinformatics; Vaccine designing

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