Preprint Hypothesis Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Status of An Inversely Coupled Oxic/Sulphidic Oscillator (OSO) in the Whole Body Chemocline Will Determine Clinical Unfolding in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)* of Any Aetiology

Version 1 : Received: 15 September 2020 / Approved: 16 September 2020 / Online: 16 September 2020 (04:07:17 CEST)

How to cite: Thangaraj, P. The Status of An Inversely Coupled Oxic/Sulphidic Oscillator (OSO) in the Whole Body Chemocline Will Determine Clinical Unfolding in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)* of Any Aetiology. Preprints 2020, 2020090346 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0346.v1). Thangaraj, P. The Status of An Inversely Coupled Oxic/Sulphidic Oscillator (OSO) in the Whole Body Chemocline Will Determine Clinical Unfolding in Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)* of Any Aetiology. Preprints 2020, 2020090346 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0346.v1).

Abstract

Life evolved in an euxinic world with subsequent oxic 'invasion' leading to two parallel but interconnected biospheres, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exemplify these worlds respectively. Their concentration gradients have informational value in meromictic lakes. Similarly, it is posited, there exists a whole body chemocline in humans in which the two molecules form an inversely coupled oxic/sulphidic oscillator (OSO). The OSO is hormetic and characterised by a range of amplitudes and frequencies in health. Deviations from its baseline profile heralds the onset of SIRS before the appearance of clinical signs. Loss of oscillator status and transition to a steady state causes widespread intercellular and inter-organ communication failure presaging multi-organ dysfunction. The salient clinico-pathophysiological features of SIRS of any aetiology are emergent phenomena related to the OSO profile. Extent of recovery of organ function will mirror the recovery of the OSO profile thereby providing a tool to predict outcomes in SIRS.

Subject Areas

Sepsis; SIRS; oxic sulphidic oscillator; risk prediction; multiorgan failure; chemocline

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.