Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Intersectional Stigma, Identity, and Culture: A Grounded Theory of Female Escort Perspectives from Brazil and Pakistan

Version 1 : Received: 11 September 2020 / Approved: 15 September 2020 / Online: 15 September 2020 (04:41:50 CEST)

How to cite: Brooks-Gordon, B.; Poli, N. Intersectional Stigma, Identity, and Culture: A Grounded Theory of Female Escort Perspectives from Brazil and Pakistan. Preprints 2020, 2020090329 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0329.v1). Brooks-Gordon, B.; Poli, N. Intersectional Stigma, Identity, and Culture: A Grounded Theory of Female Escort Perspectives from Brazil and Pakistan. Preprints 2020, 2020090329 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0329.v1).

Abstract

Intersectional experiences, socio-cultural meanings, ethnic traditions and morals compound stigma-related stress (Jackson et al., 2020; Schmitz 2019). Sex workers are subject to various stigmatizing forces which can lead to secrecy, isolation and lack of social and cultural support (Koken 2012). Stigmatizing forces include structural humanitarian governance and aid interventions that conflate migration and sex work with insidious constraints and coercion. This study explored how migrant female sex workers from distinctive ethnic cultures manage their identity on a day to day basis in relation to the separation of work and home life. Methods: The perspectives of female sex workers were collected via a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews. The inclusion criteria were that the women had worked in sex work for over 18months, defined their involvement in sex work as voluntary, and were over 18yrs of age. The perspectives of seven women from South Asian (Pakistani), Brazilian, and British backgrounds were analyzed using Grounded Theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967). Ethnicity was considered to explore how the women experienced stigma, how it impacted on the management of their identity, and how the process of change occurred. Results: The women used a variety of methods to maintain work and home life boundaries, processes they used switch into a role and all experienced stigma and tried to deal with it in ways such as concealment from friends and family. Two core categories and properties emerged from the data as participants felt guilt and/or shame but only the South Asian participants spoke of this with reference to their culture and religion. Conclusion: It was not migration per se but rather the relationship of migration to culture that was key to identity management. Participants reflected that as their country was considered collectivist country with interdependent thought, that any negativity felt could not only be reflected on the individual, but also the entire family. For these reasons Pakistani sex workers were subject to more complex stigmatizing forces, shame and guilt as regards risk and exposure. Discussion focusses on the processes and management strategies used to extend social and cultural support.

Subject Areas

sex work; stigma; intersectionality; migrant; culture

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.