Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Potential Pathological Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis

Version 1 : Received: 12 September 2020 / Approved: 13 September 2020 / Online: 13 September 2020 (15:49:10 CEST)

How to cite: Mathur, D.; Rout, S.; Mishra, B.K.; Rodas, G.L.; Vallamkondu, J.; Kandimalla, R.; Casanova, B. Potential Pathological Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2020, 2020090293 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0293.v1). Mathur, D.; Rout, S.; Mishra, B.K.; Rodas, G.L.; Vallamkondu, J.; Kandimalla, R.; Casanova, B. Potential Pathological Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2020, 2020090293 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0293.v1).

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that involves the intricate interplay of different immune cells going awry leading to inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration. Its diagnosis is quite arduous because of the baffling number of symptoms it elicits and the varied clinical manifestation it presents. The simplified criteria (in form of Macdonald’s Criteria) which have got modified several times is now the single most important criteria accepted by neurology bodies for diagnosing MS. Biomarkers from time to time have been explored to simplify the diagnosis and prognosticate MS along with anecessity to monitor treatment outcome. In recent years, research on biomarkers has advanced rapidly due to their ability to be easily and rapidly measured, their specificity, safety, and their ability to yield precise results. Biomarkers are classified into various categories including predictive, diagnostic, prognostic, related to disease activity, and monitoring treatment outcome. Each representative of the disease activity category reflects a variety of pathological processes of MS such as neuroaxonal loss, gliosis, demyelination, disability progression, remyelination, etc. This review discusses several promising serum and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and imaging biomarkers used in clinical practice. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease which is recently recognized as a definite disease will also be discussed. Furthermore, it sheds light on the criteria and the challenges a biomarker faces to be considered as a standard one.

Subject Areas

Biomarkers; Multiple Sclerosis; diagnostic; disease activity; Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG) diseases

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