Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Does Western Education Matter? Analysis of Wealth Index and Women Educational Attainment in Nigeria

Version 1 : Received: 7 September 2020 / Approved: 8 September 2020 / Online: 8 September 2020 (06:15:00 CEST)

How to cite: Abiola, B.; Obokoh, L.; Jaiyeola, A. Does Western Education Matter? Analysis of Wealth Index and Women Educational Attainment in Nigeria. Preprints 2020, 2020090177 Abiola, B.; Obokoh, L.; Jaiyeola, A. Does Western Education Matter? Analysis of Wealth Index and Women Educational Attainment in Nigeria. Preprints 2020, 2020090177

Abstract

This study used the National Demographic and Health Survey 2013 data to provide empirical answer the question of the relevance of western education in Nigeria relative to ethnic-regional practices of almajiri in the light of women’s educational attainment and wealth index in Nigeria. Women are the most vulnerable in the cultural practices in Nigeria as women’s education in Sub-Saharan Africa is far below the world average. Nigeria was recently proclaimed the world capital of poverty because it is among one of the countries with the highest number of people living below poverty line in the world with a larger proportion of poor being women. Ordinary Least Square (OLS) and Ordered Probit Model were employed to analyse the data. The results revealed a significant effect of western education on women asset accumulation and the precaurious position of women resulting from lack of western education. This implies that higher attainment of western education increases the likelihood of being wealthy. The counterfactual effect of ethnic-regional practices of almajiri confirmed the disadvantage and backwardness of women staying in the region or coming from the ethnicity. This partly explains the likelihood of the differences in the level of development across the geopolitical zones and women welfare. Based on the findings the study recommends that policy maker should provide easy access to quality education, especially at both pre-primary and primary levels for all especially women. Also issues of graduate unemployment should be addressed as it reduces return from education.

Subject Areas

Wealth index; Women education attainment; Almajiri; Poverty; Nigeria

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