Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Life of Higher Education Students: A Global Perspective

Version 1 : Received: 10 August 2020 / Approved: 10 August 2020 / Online: 10 August 2020 (15:21:04 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 18 August 2020 / Approved: 19 August 2020 / Online: 19 August 2020 (08:20:09 CEST)

How to cite: Aristovnik, A.; Keržič, D.; Ravšelj, D.; Tomaževič, N.; Umek, L. Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Life of Higher Education Students: A Global Perspective. Preprints 2020, 2020080246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0246.v2). Aristovnik, A.; Keržič, D.; Ravšelj, D.; Tomaževič, N.; Umek, L. Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Life of Higher Education Students: A Global Perspective. Preprints 2020, 2020080246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0246.v2).

Abstract

The paper presents the most comprehensive and large-scale study to date on how students perceive the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on various aspects of their lives on a global level. With a sample of 30,383 students from 62 countries, the study reveals that amid the worldwide lockdown and transition to online learning students were most satisfied with the support provided by teaching staff and their universities’ public relations. Still, deficient computer skills and the perception of a higher workload prevented them from perceiving their own improved performance in the new teaching environment. Students were mainly concerned about issues to do with their future professional career and studies, and experienced boredom, anxiety and frustration. The pandemic has led to the adoption of particular hygienic behaviours (e.g. wearing masks, washing hands) and discouraged certain daily practices (e.g. leaving home, shaking hands). Students were also more satisfied with the role played by hospitals and universities during the epidemic compared to the government and banks. The findings also show that students with selected socio-demographic characteristics (male, part-time, first level, applied sciences, lower living standard, from Africa or Asia) were generally more strongly affected by the pandemic since they were significantly less satisfied with their academic work/life. Key factors influencing students' satisfaction with the role of their university are also identified. Policymakers and higher education institutions around the world may benefit from these findings while formulating policy recommendations and strategies to support students during this and any future pandemics.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; university student; socio-demographic factors, satisfaction; perception; online learning; mental health; habits; institutions; continents

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 19 August 2020
Commenter: Aleksander Aristovnik
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Edited version with extended acknowledgments.
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