Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Identification of Toxicity Parameters Associated with Combustion Produced Soot Surface Chemistry and Particle Structure by in Vitro Assays

Version 1 : Received: 4 August 2020 / Approved: 5 August 2020 / Online: 5 August 2020 (15:39:00 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Al Housseiny, H.; Singh, M.; Emile, S.; Nicoleau, M.; Wal, R.L.V.; Silveyra, P. Identification of Toxicity Parameters Associated with Combustion Produced Soot Surface Chemistry and Particle Structure by in Vitro Assays. Biomedicines 2020, 8, 345. Al Housseiny, H.; Singh, M.; Emile, S.; Nicoleau, M.; Wal, R.L.V.; Silveyra, P. Identification of Toxicity Parameters Associated with Combustion Produced Soot Surface Chemistry and Particle Structure by in Vitro Assays. Biomedicines 2020, 8, 345.

Journal reference: Biomedicines 2020, 8, 345
DOI: 10.3390/biomedicines8090345

Abstract

Air pollution has become the world’s single biggest environmental health risk of the past decade, causing about 7 million yearly deaths worldwide. One of the dominant air pollutants is fine particulate matter (PM2.5), a product of combustion. Exposure to PM2.5 has been associated with decreased lung function, impaired immunity, and exacerbations of lung disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that many of the adverse health effects of PM2.5 exposure are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress. While the physical structure and surface chemistry of PM2.5 are surrogate measures of particle oxidative potential, little is known about their contributions to negative health effects. In this study, we used functionalized carbon black particles as surrogates for atmospherically aged combustion formed soot to assess the effects of PM2.5 surface chemistry in lung cells. We exposed the BEAS-2B lung epithelial cell line to different soot at a range of concentrations, and assessed cell viability, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that exposure to soot with varying particle surface composition results in differential cell viability rates, expression of pro-inflammatory and oxidative stress genes, and protein carbonylation. We conclude that particle surface chemistry, specifically oxygen content, in soot modulates lung cell inflammatory and oxidative stress responses.

Subject Areas

air pollution; soot; particulate matter; lung inflammation; functional groups

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.