Preprint Communication Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Enhancing Electrical Contact with a Commercial Polymer for Electrical Resistivity Tomography on Archaeological Sites: A Case Study

Version 1 : Received: 30 July 2020 / Approved: 2 August 2020 / Online: 2 August 2020 (10:58:15 CEST)

How to cite: Vásconez-Maza, M.D.; Martínez-Pagán, P.; Aktarakçi, H.; García-Nieto, M.C.; Martínez-Segura, M.A. Enhancing Electrical Contact with a Commercial Polymer for Electrical Resistivity Tomography on Archaeological Sites: A Case Study. Preprints 2020, 2020080011 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0011.v1). Vásconez-Maza, M.D.; Martínez-Pagán, P.; Aktarakçi, H.; García-Nieto, M.C.; Martínez-Segura, M.A. Enhancing Electrical Contact with a Commercial Polymer for Electrical Resistivity Tomography on Archaeological Sites: A Case Study. Preprints 2020, 2020080011 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0011.v1).

Abstract

This communication reports an improvement of the quality of the electrical data obtained from the application of electrical resistivity tomography method on archaeological studies. The electrical contact between ground and electrode enhances significantly by using carbomer-based gel during the electrical resistivity tomography measurements. Not only does the gel promote the conservation of the building surface under investigation, but it also virtually eliminates the necessity of conventional spike electrodes, which in many archaeological studies are inadequate or not permitted. Results evidenced an enhancement in the quality of the electrical data obtained in the order of thousands of units compared with those without using the carbomer-based gel. The potential and capabilities of this affordable gel make it appropriate to be applied to other geoelectrical studies beyond archaeological investigations. Moreover, it might solve corrosion issues on conventional spike electrodes, and electrical multicore cables usually provoked for added saltwater attempting to improve the electrical contact.

Subject Areas

electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method; polymer; carbomer; ground-electrode electrical contact enhancement; archaeology

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