Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Is the Internet Really Ruining Your Memory? Keep Reading as Modifiable Protective Factor Against Cognitive Impairment

Version 1 : Received: 11 June 2020 / Approved: 12 June 2020 / Online: 12 June 2020 (12:25:24 CEST)

How to cite: Ramos, H.; Alacreu, M.; Guerrero, M.D.; Sánchez, R.; Moreno, L. Is the Internet Really Ruining Your Memory? Keep Reading as Modifiable Protective Factor Against Cognitive Impairment. Preprints 2020, 2020060150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202006.0150.v1). Ramos, H.; Alacreu, M.; Guerrero, M.D.; Sánchez, R.; Moreno, L. Is the Internet Really Ruining Your Memory? Keep Reading as Modifiable Protective Factor Against Cognitive Impairment. Preprints 2020, 2020060150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202006.0150.v1).

Abstract

Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) would correspond to a preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to find associations between lifestyle individual factors compatible scores with cognitive impairment (CI) in SCD people. Methods: This is a case-control study to detect SCD, CI and potential associated factors in 497 patients over 50 years in Community Pharmacies. Three screening tests detected possible CI and patients with at least one test compatible with CI were referred to Primary Care to be evaluated. Results: In self-complaint patients statistically significant with depressive feelings were found (86.8%) with benzodiazepines consumers (83.9%) and female patients (81.2%). Thirty percent of our sample obtained scores compatible with CI. Being older than 70 years old increased the odds of obtaining scores compatible with CI. High level education, reading and internet use were able to reduce the odds of positive scores compatible with CI (37%-91%, 7%-18% and 67%-86%), whereas, one extra hour television/day increased the risk in 8%-30%. Reading was able to nullify the effect of both internet and TV consumption. Conclusion: Not just the age but also modifiable lifestyle factors are acting in favour of a cognitive decline.

Subject Areas

cognitive impairment screening; cognitive reserve; subjective memory complaints; Internet; television; reading; marital status; sleep.

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