Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Megacity Wastewater Poured into a Nearby Basin: Looking for Sustainable Scenarios in a Case Study

Version 1 : Received: 17 January 2020 / Approved: 19 January 2020 / Online: 19 January 2020 (04:58:48 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Chamizo-Checa, S.; Otazo-Sánchez, E.; Gordillo-Martínez, A.; Suárez-Sánchez, J.; González-Ramírez, C.; Muñoz-Nava, H. Megacity Wastewater Poured into A Nearby Basin: Looking for Sustainable Scenarios in A Case Study. Water 2020, 12, 824. Chamizo-Checa, S.; Otazo-Sánchez, E.; Gordillo-Martínez, A.; Suárez-Sánchez, J.; González-Ramírez, C.; Muñoz-Nava, H. Megacity Wastewater Poured into A Nearby Basin: Looking for Sustainable Scenarios in A Case Study. Water 2020, 12, 824.

Journal reference: Water 2020, 12, 824
DOI: 10.3390/w12030824

Abstract

The megacities´ sewage creates socioeconomic dependence related to water availability in the nearby zones, especially in countries with hydric stress. The present paper studies the water balance progression of realistic scenarios from 2005 to 2050 in the Mezquital Valley, the receptor of Mexico City untreated sewage since 1886, allowing agriculture irrigation in unsustainable conditions. WEAP model calculated the water demand and supply. Validation was performed with outflows data of the Tula River and simulated three scenarios: 1st) Steady-state based on inertial growth rates, 2nd) Transient scenario concerned climate change outcomes, with minor influence in surface water and hydric stress in 2050; 3rd) Transient scenario perturbed with a planned reduction of 36% in the imported wastewater and the start-up of a massive Water Treatment Plant, allowing drip and sprinkler irrigation since 2030. In the 2005-2017 period, 59% of the agriculture depended on the flood irrigation with megacity sewage. The water balance scenarios evaluated the sectorial supply of the ground and superficial water. Drip irrigation would reduce 42% of agriculture demands, but still does not grant the downflow hydroelectric requirements, aggravated by the lack of wastewater supply since 2030. This research alerts about how present policies compromise future Valley demands.

Subject Areas

water demand; megacity wastewater; hydrological balance scenarios

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.