Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Influence of Rhizosphere Fungal Diversity and Complex Community Structure to Wheat Root Rot Disease

Version 1 : Received: 30 December 2019 / Approved: 31 December 2019 / Online: 31 December 2019 (10:20:33 CET)

How to cite: Zhang, X.; Wang, H.; Ash, G.; Yu, D.; Wang, H. The Influence of Rhizosphere Fungal Diversity and Complex Community Structure to Wheat Root Rot Disease. Preprints 2019, 2019120406 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0406.v1). Zhang, X.; Wang, H.; Ash, G.; Yu, D.; Wang, H. The Influence of Rhizosphere Fungal Diversity and Complex Community Structure to Wheat Root Rot Disease. Preprints 2019, 2019120406 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0406.v1).

Abstract

Background: Wheat root rot disease due to soil-borne fungal pathogens leads to tremendous yield losses worth billions of dollars worldwide every year. It is very important to study the relationship between rhizosphere fungal diversity and wheat roots to understand the occurrence and development of wheat root rot disease. Results: A significant difference in fungal diversity was observed between the diseased and healthy groups in the heading stage, but the trend was the opposite in the filling stage. The abundance of most genera with high richness decreased significantly from the heading to the filling stage in the diseased groups; the richness of approximately one-third of all genera remained unchanged, and only a few low-richness genera, such as Fusarium and Ceratobasidium, had a very significant increase from the heading to the filling stage. In the healthy groups, the abundance of most genera increased significantly from the heading to the filling stage; the abundance of some genera did not change markedly, or the abundance of very few genera increased significantly. Physical and chemical soil indicators showed that low soil pH and density, increases in ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen contributed to the occurrence of wheat root rot disease. Conclusions: Our results revealed that in the early stages of disease, highly diverse rhizosphere fungi and a complex community structure can easily cause wheat root rot disease. The existence of pathogenic fungi is a necessary condition for wheat root rot disease, but the richness of pathogenic fungi is not necessarily important. The increases in ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and total nitrogen contributed to the occurrence of wheat root rot disease. Low soil pH and soil density are beneficial to the occurrence of wheat root rot disease.

Subject Areas

Rhizosphere; Fungal diversity; Community structure; Wheat root rot disease

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