Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Sheaves in the Brain Elucidate the Behavior of Entrained Oscillations

Version 1 : Received: 13 December 2019 / Approved: 13 December 2019 / Online: 13 December 2019 (10:37:03 CET)

How to cite: Tozzi, A. Sheaves in the Brain Elucidate the Behavior of Entrained Oscillations . Preprints 2019, 2019120179 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0179.v1). Tozzi, A. Sheaves in the Brain Elucidate the Behavior of Entrained Oscillations . Preprints 2019, 2019120179 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0179.v1).

Abstract

Once a wheat sheaf has been sealed and tied up, its packed down straws display the same orientation and zero-divergence. This observation brings us to the mathematical notion of presheaf, i.e., a topological structure in which diverging functions are locally superimposed. We show how the concepts of presheaves and the correlated globular sets, borrowed from category theory and algebraic topology, allow a well-founded mathematical approach to otherwise elusive activities of the brain. The mathematical assessment of brain functions in terms of presheaves: a) explains why spontaneous random spikes synchronize; b) leads to the counterintuitive intuition of antidromic effects in neuronal spikes: when an entrained oscillation propagates from A to B, changes in B lead to changes in A. We provide testable previsions: a) we suggest the proper locations of transcranial magnetic stimulation’s coils to improve the clinical outcomes of drug-resistant epilepsy; b) we advocate that axonal stimulation by external sources backpropagates and alters the neuronal electric oscillatory frequency. Further, we describe how the hierarchical information transmission inside globular sets provides fresh insights concerning different issues at various coarse-grained scales, such as object persistence, memory reinforcement in spite of random noise, Bayesian inferential circuits.

Subject Areas

globular set; category theory; multidimensional; visual recognition; drug-resistant epilepsy; transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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