Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Potential Health Risk Associated with Edible Vegetable Grown on Cr (VI) Simulated Soils

Version 1 : Received: 2 November 2019 / Approved: 4 November 2019 / Online: 4 November 2019 (03:29:35 CET)

How to cite: Oruko, R.; Edokpayi, J.; Msagati, T.; Nikita, T.; Ijoma, G.; Odiyo, J. The Potential Health Risk Associated with Edible Vegetable Grown on Cr (VI) Simulated Soils. Preprints 2019, 2019110034 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0034.v1). Oruko, R.; Edokpayi, J.; Msagati, T.; Nikita, T.; Ijoma, G.; Odiyo, J. The Potential Health Risk Associated with Edible Vegetable Grown on Cr (VI) Simulated Soils. Preprints 2019, 2019110034 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0034.v1).

Abstract

This study reports on the assessment of the growth potential of five edible vegetables which were grown in Cr (VI) spiked soils. The vegetable plants that were used in this study were Vigna angularis, Cicer arietinum, Spinacia oleracea, Amaranthus dubius Thell and Phaseolus vulgaris. Dried ground samples from roots, stems and leaves were analysed for various oxidation states of Cr. The daily intake of chromium (DIC), hazard quotient (HQ) and hazard index (HI) methods were employed to assess the potential human health risks posed by these Cr oxidation states through vegetable consumption. The results showed that Vigna angularis was the only vegetable that germinated in highly concentrated Cr (VI) in the simulated soil (456 mg/kg). The highest bioaccumulation factor of CrT in the roots was found in Cicer arietinum at 3.5 ± 0.51 mg/kg DW. The highest translocation factor in stem was that of Cicer arietinum and Vigna angularis at 1.0 ± 0.00, while Cicer arietinum and Spinacia oleracea translocated highest Cr to the leaf at 2.1 ± 0.21. A child or an adult consuming such contaminated Cicer arietinum were likely to take in between 508 -785 mg/kg/day of total Cr which were above the World Health Organisation guidelines of 220 and 340 mg/kg/day, respectively. The highest HQ was found in Cicer arietinum at 8.7 and 13.4 for adults and children, respectively. The same species of plants had also high HI at 17.4 and 27.2 for adults and children respectively. This indicated that consumers of the edible vegetables grown in Cr (VI) rich soil may be exposed to health risks and the children were more likely to be vulnerable to these adverse effects than the adult.

Subject Areas

bioaccumulation; edible vegetables; hazard quotient; health index; speciation

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