Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Oasis Evolution in Response to Human Induced Water Resources Reallocation in South Xinjiang during Past Four Decades

Version 1 : Received: 15 October 2019 / Approved: 16 October 2019 / Online: 16 October 2019 (09:46:33 CEST)

How to cite: Ma, Y.; Wang, J.; Yan, F.; Mamat, A. Oasis Evolution in Response to Human Induced Water Resources Reallocation in South Xinjiang during Past Four Decades. Preprints 2019, 2019100184 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0184.v1). Ma, Y.; Wang, J.; Yan, F.; Mamat, A. Oasis Evolution in Response to Human Induced Water Resources Reallocation in South Xinjiang during Past Four Decades. Preprints 2019, 2019100184 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0184.v1).

Abstract

Vegetation in drylands is sensitive to climatic changes and human activities. Remote sensing and spatial analyses provide us useful tools for monitoring long-term vegetation dynamics over large regional scale. In this study, we analyzed the oasis vegetation cover change of the Tarim Basin using Landsat data sets from six epochs, 1975s, 1990s, 2000s, 2005s, 2010s and 2014. The results show that vegetation cover of oases increases from 34600 km2 in 1975s to 101000 km2 in 2014, though there was a vegetation coverage decrease from 77600 km2 in 2000s to 42680 km2 in 2010s. The percentage of annul water consumption has increased from 34% in 1970s to 52% in 2010s in the upper Tarim River, and decreased from 15% in 1970s to 9% in 2010s in the lower Tarim River. The decrease of oases area from 2000s to 2010s probably resulted from the rapid urbanization and large scale land reclamation. Although there is an increasing trend for oases coverage, local degradation of oases especially in the northern part occurred. This may be caused by inadequate water supply of the Tarim River. The results of multiple regression show that human activities contribute 70% of oases area change. Human induced water resources reallocation and heat energy balance is the primary cause of total oasis change.

Subject Areas

oasis; climatic change; human activities; water resources; remote sensing; Tarim River basin

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