Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Outcomes of a Cluster Randomized Trial in Young Breast Cancer Survivors and Blood Relatives: Surveillance and Genetic Services

Version 1 : Received: 2 September 2019 / Approved: 5 September 2019 / Online: 5 September 2019 (16:16:34 CEST)

How to cite: Katapodi, M.C.; Ming, C.; Northouse, L.L.; Duffy, S.A.; Duquette, D.; Mendelsohn-Victor, K.E.; Milliron, K.J.; Merajver, S.D.; Dinov, I.D.; Janz, N.K. Outcomes of a Cluster Randomized Trial in Young Breast Cancer Survivors and Blood Relatives: Surveillance and Genetic Services. Preprints 2019, 2019090065 Katapodi, M.C.; Ming, C.; Northouse, L.L.; Duffy, S.A.; Duquette, D.; Mendelsohn-Victor, K.E.; Milliron, K.J.; Merajver, S.D.; Dinov, I.D.; Janz, N.K. Outcomes of a Cluster Randomized Trial in Young Breast Cancer Survivors and Blood Relatives: Surveillance and Genetic Services. Preprints 2019, 2019090065

Abstract

We compared the efficacy of a tailored and a targeted intervention designed to increase clinical breast exam (CBE), mammography, and genetic services/testing among young breast cancer survivors (YBCS) (diagnosed <45 years old) and their blood relatives. A two-arm cluster randomized trial recruited a random sample of YBCS from the Michigan cancer registry and up to two of their blood relatives. Participants were stratified according to race and randomly assigned as family units to the tailored (n=637) or the targeted (n=595) intervention. Approximately 40% of participants were Black; 12% YBCS and 27% relatives were living in more than 20 different U.S. States. Higher screening rates were reported by YBCS (CBE p=0.05; mammography p=0.04) and relatives (CBE p<0.01; mammography p=0.04) in the tailored arm, and by White/Other YBCS (CBE p=0.02) and relatives (CBE p<0.01; mammography p=0.03). YBCS genetic testing rates increased from 22% to 26% (p=0.11). Black YBCS and relatives reported higher self-efficacy and intention for genetic testing, and higher satisfaction and intervention acceptance. The tailored intervention improved CBE and mammography uptake - despite having minimal contact with participants. Professional referrals will improve genetic testing uptake. Intervention materials increased self-efficacy and satisfaction for Black women but could not overcome multiple access barriers.

Subject Areas

HBOC; statewide random sampling; cancer survivorship; targeted intervention; tailored intervention; black participants; family recruitment

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.