Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Community-Based Participatory Research and Drug Utilization Research to Improve Childhood Diarrhea Case Management in Ujjain, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey

Version 1 : Received: 7 May 2019 / Approved: 9 May 2019 / Online: 9 May 2019 (12:39:13 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 14 May 2019 / Approved: 14 May 2019 / Online: 14 May 2019 (11:46:53 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Mathur, A.; Baghel, D.; Jaat, J.; Diwan, V.; Pathak, A. Community-Based Participatory Research and Drug Utilization Research to Improve Childhood Diarrhea Case Management in Ujjain, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1646. Mathur, A.; Baghel, D.; Jaat, J.; Diwan, V.; Pathak, A. Community-Based Participatory Research and Drug Utilization Research to Improve Childhood Diarrhea Case Management in Ujjain, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1646.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1646
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16091646

Abstract

Childhood diarrhea continues to be a major cause of under-five (U-5) mortality globally and in India. In this study, 1571 U-5 children residing in nine rural villages and four urban slums in Ujjain, India were included with the objective to use community participation and drug utilization research to improve diarrheal case management. The mean age was 2.08 years, with 297 (19%), children living in high diarrheal index households. Most mothers (70%) considered stale food, teething (62%), and hot weather (55%) as causes of diarrhea. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH)-related characteristics revealed that most (93%) households had toilets, but only 23% of the children used them. The study identified ineffective household water treatment by filtration through cloth by most (93%) households and dumping of household waste on the streets (89%). The results revealed low community awareness of correct causes of diarrhea (poor hand hygiene, 21%; littering around the household, 15%) and of correct diarrhea treatment (oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc use, 29% and 11%, respectively) and a high antibiotic prescription rate by healthcare providers (83%). Based on the results of the present study, context-specific house-to-house interventions will be designed and implemented.

Subject Areas

child; diarrhea; water sanitation and hygiene; rehydration solution; zinc; case management; antibacterial agents; drug utilization; community participation; India

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