Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Characterising Recycled Organic and Mineral Materials for Use as Filter Media in Biofiltration Systems

Version 1 : Received: 1 April 2019 / Approved: 2 April 2019 / Online: 2 April 2019 (15:35:29 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lucas, S.A.; CC Lee, C.; Love, E. Characterising Recycled Organic and Mineral Materials for Use as Filter Media in Biofiltration Systems. Water 2019, 11, 1074. Lucas, S.A.; CC Lee, C.; Love, E. Characterising Recycled Organic and Mineral Materials for Use as Filter Media in Biofiltration Systems. Water 2019, 11, 1074.

Journal reference: Water 2019, 11, 1074
DOI: 10.3390/w11051074

Abstract

Filter Media (FM) sourced from recycled organic and mineral material offers a low cost and effective means of treating urban stormwater. Using recycled materials rather than from an increasingly scarce source of virgin materials (typically sandy loam soil) can ensure a sustainable long-term economy and environment. This paper presents results from the laboratory analysis and mathematical modeling to highlight the performance of recycled organic and mineral material in removing nutrients and metals from stormwater. Analysis included physical and chemical characterisation such as particle size distribution, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat), bulk density, effective cation exchange capacity, and pollutant removal performance. Design mixes (DM), comprising a combination of organic and mineral materials, were characterised and used to develop/derive modelling design within the Model for Urban Stormwater Improvement Conceptualisation (MUSIC v6) [1]. Comparison is made to the Adoption Guidelines for Stormwater Biofiltration Systems - Summary Report [2] which were based on the Facility for Advancing Water Biofiltration (FAWB) guidelines to assist in the development of biofiltration systems, including the planning, design, construction and operation of those systems. An observed outcome from over two decades of biofiltration guideline development has been the exclusion of alternative biofilter materials due to claims of excessive leaching. Results from this study indicate that high nutrient and metal removal rates can be achieved over a range of hydraulic conductivities using design mixes of recycled organic and mineral materials that have a demonstrated equivalence to existing guideline specifications.

Subject Areas

compost, nutrient leaching; pollutant removal; stormwater quality, system modeling

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.