Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Association of a Multi-Gene Panel with Blood Pressure Medication Success in Patients with Hypertension: A Pilot Study

Version 1 : Received: 1 October 2018 / Approved: 2 October 2018 / Online: 2 October 2018 (15:02:46 CEST)

How to cite: Snyder, E.; Sprissler, R.; Johnson, M.; Beenken, G.; Curry, T.; Cassuto, N.; Kelley, E.; Olson, T. Association of a Multi-Gene Panel with Blood Pressure Medication Success in Patients with Hypertension: A Pilot Study. Preprints 2018, 2018100028 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0028.v1). Snyder, E.; Sprissler, R.; Johnson, M.; Beenken, G.; Curry, T.; Cassuto, N.; Kelley, E.; Olson, T. Association of a Multi-Gene Panel with Blood Pressure Medication Success in Patients with Hypertension: A Pilot Study. Preprints 2018, 2018100028 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0028.v1).

Abstract

Several common and functional genes are known to contribute to responsiveness to blood pressure (BP) therapy. BP therapy is typically guided by algorithms that do not include a patient’s genetic information. This study aimed to determine the impact of a multi-organ genetic panel on BP response to pharmacotherapy. Eighty-six patients completed one study visit consisting of a buccal swab collection, measurement of office BP, and a medical chart review for BP history. Genes analyzed included those that encode for one drug metabolizing enzyme, renal Na+ handling, vascular, and cardiac function. Relationships between genotype and control of BP (<140/<90), ∆ systolic BP, ∆ diastolic BP, and ∆ mean arterial BP were assessed. SLC12A3 resulted in a significant association between the target drug and the functional genotype for BP control (<140/<90 cut off) (p<0.05). Conversely, three of five renal genotypes were associated with BP control using 120/80 as a cut-off (p<0.05). Three of four cardiac genotypes were associated with the BP control at <140/<90, with one being statistically significant (position 49 of ADRB1). Only one vascular genotype was predictive of blood pressure control at <140/<90. We found a significant drop in mean BP from baseline in six genes, three important in the diuretic response and three in β-blockade (p<0.05 on target drug vs. not). These results demonstrate that a multi-gene panel for renal Na+ handling, vascular function, and cardiac output may influence the BP response to therapy, but larger studies with more statistical power are needed.

Subject Areas

Hypertension; Blood pressure; Genetics; Pharmacogenetics; Pharmacotherapy; Treatment

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.