Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

A Comparison of the Visual Perceptual Processing Skills of Children (6-10 Years Old) with and without Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) Using the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-3rd Edition (TVPS-3) in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Version 1 : Received: 24 August 2018 / Approved: 27 August 2018 / Online: 27 August 2018 (13:36:15 CEST)

How to cite: Chinembiri, B.; Wei, C.; Ming, Z.; Kai, S. A Comparison of the Visual Perceptual Processing Skills of Children (6-10 Years Old) with and without Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) Using the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-3rd Edition (TVPS-3) in Harare, Zimbabwe.. Preprints 2018, 2018080462 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0462.v1). Chinembiri, B.; Wei, C.; Ming, Z.; Kai, S. A Comparison of the Visual Perceptual Processing Skills of Children (6-10 Years Old) with and without Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) Using the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-3rd Edition (TVPS-3) in Harare, Zimbabwe.. Preprints 2018, 2018080462 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0462.v1).

Abstract

Abstract Introduction: Visual perceptual skills are essential for independent participation in self-care tasks, educational, work and leisure time activities. The effect of HIV on the visual perceptual skills is not well understood among children in low resource settings like Zimbabwe. Methods: A cross sectional comparative study was done with 30 children living with HIV and 30 children living without HIV residing in Harare urban area. The TVPS-3 was used to assess their visual perceptual skills. SPSS version 22, STATISTICA 13 and Microsoft 2016 were used for data analysis. Results: Both groups of children had mean percentile ranks below 50 on their TVPS-3 scores. Children without HIV generally performed better than those with HIV but the difference was not statistically significant in most cases. Through univariate analysis, only performance on Spatial Relations significantly differed between the two groups. Both groups had lowest scores in Basic visual perceptual skills. Age and school grade were the independent predictors of the children’s performances in the study. Conclusion: There is need for Occupational therapy services in public primary schools and in the pediatric Opportunistic Infections clinics in hospitals to be part of the health team which caters for children with visual perceptual challenges.

Subject Areas

Key words: Occupational therapy, visual perceptual skills, Test of Visual Perceptual Skills-3 (TVPS-3), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

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