Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Perspective: Conventional Infection Prevention and Control Practices in Post-Antibiotic Era

Version 1 : Received: 2 August 2018 / Approved: 5 August 2018 / Online: 5 August 2018 (10:18:40 CEST)

How to cite: Singh, S. Perspective: Conventional Infection Prevention and Control Practices in Post-Antibiotic Era. Preprints 2018, 2018080090 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0090.v1). Singh, S. Perspective: Conventional Infection Prevention and Control Practices in Post-Antibiotic Era. Preprints 2018, 2018080090 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0090.v1).

Abstract

The antibiotic or antimicrobial resistance is rapidly spreading in microbes relevant to human health. Two visible major contributory factors have been the indiscriminate overuse of antimicrobials for preventing diseases in human and to enhance the productivity in agriculture sector. To mitigate the potential threat posed by post-antibiotic era, the global health stakeholders have been making extra efforts at a war footing to formulate and implement global and national plans of action. In the current article, an endeavour is made to provide a perspective to look beyond the current focus on just use of the antimicrobials. Attention has been drawn towards various obvious and not-so-obvious self-preservation infection-prevention practices in vogue from the pre-antibiotic era whose usage has been on decline in the antibiotic era for various reasons. Particularly, the practices with a clear potential to effectively decrease the spread of pathogens through contact, curtail the evolution and dissemination of the antimicrobial resistance in local environment and its introduction into the global community, should be Identified and strengthened to make them part of comprehensive hygiene and quarantine practices. Broadly, the suggestions pertaining to the personal and community hygiene including bereavement practices, isolation and quarantine of suspected pathogen carriers, and water and environment security have been made to invoke a constructive debate and discussion among various stakeholders for their evaluation and implementation to effectively delay the development of antimicrobial resistance wherever possible and disrupt its spread to pathogens.

Subject Areas

antimicrobial resistance; infection control practices; antibiotic resistance; pathogens; coevolution

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