Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Clogging Impacts on Distribution Pipe Delivery of Street Runoff to an Infiltration Bed

Version 1 : Received: 4 July 2018 / Approved: 4 July 2018 / Online: 4 July 2018 (15:18:14 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tu, M.-C.; Traver, R. Clogging Impacts on Distribution Pipe Delivery of Street Runoff to an Infiltration Bed. Water 2018, 10, 1045. Tu, M.-C.; Traver, R. Clogging Impacts on Distribution Pipe Delivery of Street Runoff to an Infiltration Bed. Water 2018, 10, 1045.

Journal reference: Water 2018, 10, 1045
DOI: 10.3390/w10081045

Abstract

Performance of flow through orifices on a perforated distribution pipe between periods with and without partial clogging (submersion of part of the distribution pipe) was compared. The distribution pipe directly receives runoff and delivers it to an underground infiltration bed. Partial clogging appeared in winter but reduced in summer. Performance was defined as flow rate divided by l_eff (h_(d,mean)^0.5) where h_(d,mean) is the mean pressure head that drives flow and l_eff is the effective pipe length (length of water column with pipe water volume and the pipe cross-sectional area). ANCOVA (ANalysis of COVAriance) was adopted to examine the clogging effects with flow rate plotted against l_eff (h_(d,mean)^0.5) . Partial clogging had a significant effect on pipe performance during periods of low or no rainfall. However, if only data during larger storms was considered, little evidence showed that partial clogging had effects on pipe delivery performance. Partial clogging might be caused by leaves accumulated in the lower section of the pipe in winter, and its effect was insignificant when water level rose in the pipe, utilizing significantly more orifices on the distribution pipe, thus the effect from the clogged portion had negligible impact on system performance. Larger storms might also provide the required flow rate to move the debris block thus exposing the orifices. Partial clogging did not increase the tendency of overflow; therefore, current maintenance schedule was sufficient to keep the distribution pipe at satisfactory performance even though partial clogging can exist.

Subject Areas

ANCOVA; Blockage; Clogging; Efficient; Green infrastructure; Infiltration bed; Orifice; Perforation; Performance; Philadelphia; Pipe; Stormwater

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