Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Management Strategies of Ocular Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome: Current Perspective

Version 1 : Received: 8 May 2018 / Approved: 9 May 2018 / Online: 9 May 2018 (06:37:24 CEST)

How to cite: Esfandiari, H.; Ansari, S.; Rabie, H.M. Management Strategies of Ocular Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome: Current Perspective. Preprints 2018, 2018050139 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0139.v1). Esfandiari, H.; Ansari, S.; Rabie, H.M. Management Strategies of Ocular Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome: Current Perspective. Preprints 2018, 2018050139 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0139.v1).

Abstract

Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic connective tissue disorder that results from mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene located on chromosome band 15q 15–21. Fibrillin, a glycoprotein, is widely expressed throughout the body and contribute to elasticity and force-bearing capacity of connective tissue. In the eye, fibrillin is a key constituent of the ciliary zonules, which suspend the crystalline lens in place. The zonular defect leads to ectopia lentis that is hallmark of Marfan ocular abnormalities and occurs in 60 to 80% of cases. Other less common ocular features of Marfan syndrome are increased axial length, astigmatism, and flat cornea. Visual function in Marfan syndrome could be affected in several ways: ectopia lentis, refractive error, amblyopia, retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Management of subluxated lens starts with correction of refractive error with eyeglasses in mild cases. In more severe cases, especially when lens bisects the pupil, complete correction of refractive error is impossible without removing subluxated lens. The best method for visual rehabilitation after lens extraction is still debated. Aphakic Artisan implantation at the time of subluxated lens removal results in good visual outcomes with acceptable safety profile. Studies with longer term follow up and larger sample populations are needed to evaluate the safety of this procedure in patients with Marfan syndrome.

Subject Areas

Marfan syndrome; ophthalmology; ectopis lentis; ocular complication; management

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.