Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Influence of Feeding Practices on Malnutrition in Haitian Infants and Young Children

Version 1 : Received: 7 January 2018 / Approved: 9 January 2018 / Online: 9 January 2018 (05:23:01 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Irarrázaval, B.; Barja, S.; Bustos, E.; Doirsaint, R.; Senethmm, G.; Guzmán, M.P.; Uauy, R. Influence of Feeding Practices on Malnutrition in Haitian Infants and Young Children. Nutrients 2018, 10, 382. Irarrázaval, B.; Barja, S.; Bustos, E.; Doirsaint, R.; Senethmm, G.; Guzmán, M.P.; Uauy, R. Influence of Feeding Practices on Malnutrition in Haitian Infants and Young Children. Nutrients 2018, 10, 382.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2018, 10, 382
DOI: 10.3390/nu10030382

Abstract

Infant malnutrition remains as an important cause of death and disability, Haiti has the highest prevalence in America, so preventive strategies are needed. Our objective was to assess infant and young children malnutrition in Haiti and to study an association to World Health Organization (WHO) recommended feeding practices adherence. Cross-sectional study of children younger than 2 years old, recruited at Saint Espri Health Center, Port Au Prince (August to September 2014). We registered feeding practices, social and demographic data, and performed anthropometry (WHO-2006 standard). We evaluated 278 infants and young children, 8.08 ± 6.5 months old, 53.2% female. 18.35% had underweight; 13.31% were stunted and 13.67% had moderate or severe wasting. Malnutrition was associated to male gender, older age, lower education of mothers and higher number of siblings. The adherence to WHO recommended practices for breastfeeding was from 11.8 to 97.9% and was related to a lower prevalence of malnutrition. For complementary food, adherence was 9.7 to 90.3%, also associated to lower malnutrition. Conclusion: Prevalence of infant and young children malnutrition in this Haitian Health Center population was high, related to some risk factors. The adherence to WHO recommended feeding practices was associated to a better nutritional status.

Subject Areas

breastfeeding; feeding practices; infant feeding; nutrition; malnutrition; pediatrics; primary health care

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