Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Proteomic Analysis Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Fruit Ripening in Response to Exogenous Ethylene in Kiwifruit Cultivars

These authors contributed equally to the work.
Version 1 : Received: 29 December 2017 / Approved: 29 December 2017 / Online: 29 December 2017 (09:01:57 CET)

How to cite: Shin, M.H.; Muneer, S.; Lee, J.J.; Bae, D.W.; Kwack, Y.B.; Kim, J.G. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Fruit Ripening in Response to Exogenous Ethylene in Kiwifruit Cultivars. Preprints 2017, 2017120200 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0200.v1). Shin, M.H.; Muneer, S.; Lee, J.J.; Bae, D.W.; Kwack, Y.B.; Kim, J.G. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Fruit Ripening in Response to Exogenous Ethylene in Kiwifruit Cultivars. Preprints 2017, 2017120200 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0200.v1).

Abstract

An understanding of the mechanism underlying fruit ripening is critical for fruit quality improvement. Although post-harvest ethylene application is known to enhance the onset of fruit ripening, exact mechanisms remain unclear. To characterize the fruit ripening process and mechanism, we investigated the effects of exposing kiwifruit cultivars ‘Hayward’ and ‘Gamrok’ to exogenous ethylene treatment post-harvest using comprehensive proteomic analyses. Comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that most of the proteins aggregated in ethylene-treated samples compared to the control (non-treated). We observed that among all ethylene treatments, 95 proteins from ‘Hayward’ and 106 from ‘Gamrok’ were differentially expressed. Interestingly, among the elicited protein successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 50% from “Hayward’ and 60% from ‘Gamrok’ are associated with fruit ripening. Furthermore, 18% and 10% of proteins, respectively, are associated with defense response, whereas other major proteins are related to protein biosynthesis and photosynthesis/Calvin cycle. Interactions between identified proteins were demonstrated by bioinformatic analysis, providing insights into biological pathways and molecular functions in post-harvest kiwifruit ripening elicited by ethylene application. The present proteomic study in accordance with physiological analysis provides a quantitative evaluation of fruit ripening in response to exogenous ethylene in post-harvest kiwifruit.

Subject Areas

Actinidia deliciosa; ethylene; fruit ripening; mass spectrometry; post-harvest; proteomics

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