Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Feasibility of a Multicomponent Training for People with Moderate to Severe Dementia Living in a Long-Term Care Home – Social Ethical Approach

Version 1 : Received: 28 May 2021 / Approved: 31 May 2021 / Online: 31 May 2021 (09:45:37 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kruse, A.; Cordes, T.; Schulz, S.; Wollesen, B. Feasibility of Multicomponent Training for People with Moderate to Severe Dementia Living in a Long-Term Care Home: A Social Ethical Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7631. Kruse, A.; Cordes, T.; Schulz, S.; Wollesen, B. Feasibility of Multicomponent Training for People with Moderate to Severe Dementia Living in a Long-Term Care Home: A Social Ethical Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7631.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7631
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18147631

Abstract

Multicomponent training is recommended for people with dementia living in long-term care homes. Nevertheless, evidence is limited and people with severe dementia are often excluded from trials. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate (1) the feasibility and (2) the requirements regarding a multicomponent training for people with moderate to severe dementia. The study was conducted as an uncontrolled single arm pilot study with a mixed methods approach. 15 nursing home residents with a mean age of 82 years (range: 75-90 years; female: 64%) with moderate to severe dementia received 16 weeks of multicomponent training. Feasibility and requirements of the training were assessed by a standardized observation protocol. Eleven participants regularly attended the intervention. The highest active participation was observed during gait exercises (64%), the lowest during strength exercises (33%). It was supportive if exercises were task-specific or related to everyday life. This study confirms that a multicomponent training for the target group is (1) feasible and well accepted. To enhance active participation (2) individual instructions and the implementation of exercises related to everyday life is required. The effectiveness of the adapted training should be tested in future randomized controlled trials.

Keywords

Dementia; multicomponent training; long-term care home; social ethical approach

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