Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Mouth Rinsing and Ingesting Pickle Juice Are No More Effective Than Water for Inhibiting Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps

Version 1 : Received: 30 April 2021 / Approved: 5 May 2021 / Online: 5 May 2021 (12:23:02 CEST)

How to cite: Georgieva, J.; Brade, C.J.; Ducker, K.J.; Davey, P.; Jacques, A.; Ohno, M.; Lavender, A.P. Mouth Rinsing and Ingesting Pickle Juice Are No More Effective Than Water for Inhibiting Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps. Preprints 2021, 2021050045 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0045.v1). Georgieva, J.; Brade, C.J.; Ducker, K.J.; Davey, P.; Jacques, A.; Ohno, M.; Lavender, A.P. Mouth Rinsing and Ingesting Pickle Juice Are No More Effective Than Water for Inhibiting Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps. Preprints 2021, 2021050045 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0045.v1).

Abstract

(1) Background: Stimulating oropharyngeal transient receptor potential (TRP) channels inhibits muscle cramping by triggering a supraspinal reflex to reduce α-motor neuron hyperexcitability. This study investigated whether longer stimulation of TRP channels via mouth rinsing with PJ is more effective than drinking PJ at inhibiting an electrically induced muscle cramp (EIMC); (2) Methods: Tibial nerve in 11 cramp-prone adults were percutaneously stimulated to elicit an EIMC of flexor hallucis brevis in three trials 1-week apart. At cramp onset participants received mouth rinsing and expelling PJ (25 mL), ingesting PJ (1 mL∙kg-1 body-mass [BM]), or ingesting water (1 mL∙kg-1 BM). Cramp onset and offset by electromyography and severity of discomfort was recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS); (3) Results: Median time to cramp cessation as a percentage of water was 82.8% ± 14.634 and 68.6% ± 47.782 for PJ ingestion and mouth rinse respectively. These results had large variability and no statistically significant difference was observed. There were also no differences in perceived cramp discomfort between conditions, despite hazard ratios for time to VAS = 0 higher than water for PJ ingestion (22%) and mouth rinse (35%) (p = 0.66 and 0.51 respectively); (4) Conclusions: Data suggest no difference in cramp duration and perceived discomfort between PJ and water.

Keywords

Cramping; electromyography; electrical stimulation; cramp induction; flexor hallucis brevis; pickle juice; oropharyngeal transient receptor

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