Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Unraveling the Etiology of Pediatric Vertigo and Dizziness: A Tertiary Pediatric Center Experience

Version 1 : Received: 30 March 2021 / Approved: 31 March 2021 / Online: 31 March 2021 (11:35:13 CEST)

How to cite: Božanić Urbančič, N.; Vozel, D.; Urbančič, J.; Battelino, S. Unraveling the Etiology of Pediatric Vertigo and Dizziness: A Tertiary Pediatric Center Experience. Preprints 2021, 2021030760 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0760.v1). Božanić Urbančič, N.; Vozel, D.; Urbančič, J.; Battelino, S. Unraveling the Etiology of Pediatric Vertigo and Dizziness: A Tertiary Pediatric Center Experience. Preprints 2021, 2021030760 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0760.v1).

Abstract

Objective: The causes of vertigo and dizziness in children are diverse and require attention from various specialists. Numerous authors have reported that the commonest type of vertigo in children is migraine-associated vertigo (vestibular migraine and benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood - BPV). We aimed to check whether this could be applied to our group of patients. Materials and methods: A retrospective case series of 257 consecutive pediatric vertigo and diz-ziness patients referred to the tertiary pediatric ENT clinic from 2015 to 2020. Patients received a complete audiovestibular workup and were referred to pediatric neurologists and other special-ists depending on the signs and symptoms. Results: Of 257 children aged 1-17 years, almost one fifth of them, 49/257 (19.1 %) had a central type of vertigo, 20/257 of them (7.8%) had benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood and 4/257 (1.6%) had a migrainous type of vertigo. Most of the children, 112/257 (43.6%), remained unclas-sified, without a final diagnosis. Conclusion: Due to the numerous possible causes, a child presenting with dizziness and vertigo requires a multidisciplinary approach. In the majority of cases, vertigo spells are self-limiting. They stop spontaneously and sometimes remain clinically undiagnosed. The most prevalent reasons for pediatric vertigo may be temporary hemodynamic (vaso-vagal) and psychological imbalance.

Subject Areas

Dizziness; Vertigo; Migraine Disorders; Interdisciplinary Communication; Headache; Medulloblastoma; Lyme Neuroborreliosis; Somatoform Disorders; Child; Adolescent

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.