Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Cognitive and Neuroimaging Correlates of Insomnia Symptoms in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot-Study

Version 1 : Received: 2 March 2021 / Approved: 3 March 2021 / Online: 3 March 2021 (14:14:41 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Ramos, A.R.; Alperin, N.; Lee, S.; Gonzalez, K.A.; Tarraf, W.; Hernandez-Cardenache, R. Cognitive and Neuroimaging Correlates of the Insomnia Severity Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot-Study. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 5314. Ramos, A.R.; Alperin, N.; Lee, S.; Gonzalez, K.A.; Tarraf, W.; Hernandez-Cardenache, R. Cognitive and Neuroimaging Correlates of the Insomnia Severity Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot-Study. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 5314.

Journal reference: Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 5314
DOI: 10.3390/app11125314

Abstract

We aim to determine the sleep correlates of age-related brain loss in a sample of middle-aged to older males with obstructive sleep apnea. We evaluated consecutive treatment naïve male patients with OSA (AHI≥15 events/hr) without dementia, stroke or heart disease, from January to November of 2019. We collected demographic variables, vascular risk factors, and sleep questionnaires. We also obtained computerized neurocognitive testing with the Go-No-Go Response Inhibition Test, Stroop Interference Test, Catch Game Test, Staged Information Processing Speed Test, Verbal Memory Test and Non-Verbal Memory Test. We derived age and education adjusted domain-specific Z-scores for global cognition, memory, attention, processing speed and executive function. We used brain MRI T1-weighted images to derive total hippocampal and gray matter volumes. Partial correlations evaluated associations between the ISI, AHI, and oxygen level during sleep, with cognitive domains and brain volumes. Sixteen participants, age 40-76 years, 73% Hispanic/Latino, with mean AHI=48.9±25.5 and mean oxygen saturation of 91.4±6.9% during sleep. Hypertension was seen in 66% and diabetes in 27%. We observed that ISI and oxygen level during sleep had strong correlations with brain volumes and cognition. These preliminary findings may aid in developing future strategies to improve age-related brain loss in OSA.

Keywords

Sleep apnea; hypoxemia; cognitive; brain health; MRI

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Allergology

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