Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Physical Activity Levels in Alaska Native Children Participating in the SkiKu/AK Nordic Program

Version 1 : Received: 24 December 2020 / Approved: 25 December 2020 / Online: 25 December 2020 (13:15:58 CET)

How to cite: Taber, K.; Campbell, C.; Coker, M.S.; Flora, L.; Coker, R.H. Physical Activity Levels in Alaska Native Children Participating in the SkiKu/AK Nordic Program. Preprints 2020, 2020120662 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0662.v1). Taber, K.; Campbell, C.; Coker, M.S.; Flora, L.; Coker, R.H. Physical Activity Levels in Alaska Native Children Participating in the SkiKu/AK Nordic Program. Preprints 2020, 2020120662 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0662.v1).

Abstract

Background: Physical activity is recommended to mitigate the incidence of obesity, but delivery of community wide initiatives is cumbersome. The challenges met by such programs are magnified when implementation transpires in the remote villages of Alaska. To overcome the difficulty of this challenge in the Arctic, the Skiku/AK Nordic cross-country skiing program was developed. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to Skiku/AK Nordic program would promote physical activity levels that met the daily recommendations for physical activity in Alaska Native children. Methods: Eight children (4 females and 4 males; 10±2 years/age) were recruited from Kaktovik, Alaska for participation in this study. Expert coaches and staff provided one week of cross-country ski instruction and access to ski equipment. Physical activity was monitored using ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Data collected from the devices was then downloaded and analyzed using ActiLife software. Results: The participants expended ~586 calories/day devoted to physical activity. Light and moderate physical activity was 68±38 minutes/day and 447±248 minutes/day, respectively. Conclusions: Delivery of the Skiku/AK Nordic program promoted favorable levels of physical activity in Alaska Native children. Further research is needed to assess the longitudinal and seasonal effectiveness of the Skiku/AK Nordic program.

Keywords

Exercise; Health; Obesity; Northern Latitudes; Cross-country skiing

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.