Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Formal Cattle Marketing in Rural Zimbabwe in Light of Covid-19: Implications for Sustainable Livelihoods and Development

Version 1 : Received: 22 December 2020 / Approved: 24 December 2020 / Online: 24 December 2020 (09:34:45 CET)

How to cite: Munyede, P. Formal Cattle Marketing in Rural Zimbabwe in Light of Covid-19: Implications for Sustainable Livelihoods and Development. Preprints 2020, 2020120613 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0613.v1). Munyede, P. Formal Cattle Marketing in Rural Zimbabwe in Light of Covid-19: Implications for Sustainable Livelihoods and Development. Preprints 2020, 2020120613 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0613.v1).

Abstract

In rural Zimbabwe, selling of cattle has for a long time been one of the most dependable sources of income that has sustained livelihoods for decades. Informal cattle marketing which involves door to door or gate sales has been the most predominant system for the last three decades. However, the outbreak of the global COVID-19 pandemic followed by the imposition of lockdowns has exposed the vulnerability of rural communities that are regressing into poverty due to a lack of alternative sources of income. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to delineate how formal cattle markets could be used as a sustainable source of income for rural communities’ livelihoods during and post the COVID-19 pandemic era. This qualitative research study relied on secondary data from published journal articles, online publications, and reports to understand the COVID-19 pandemic and also understand how it has impacted the livelihoods of people in rural Zimbabwe. The findings show that the current informal cattle marketing system is no longer suitable for rural communities as it exposes them to infections due to the challenges in ensuring compliance with the World Health Organisation (WHO) precautionary measures. It is recommended that formal (public) cattle markets be reintroduced in all rural areas as there is the certainty that WHO health guidelines will be enforced since they are organised by local and central government institutions. Since formal cattle markets offer competitive market-related prices this will then guarantee the flow of regular income thereby reducing the vulnerability of rural communities to poverty and inequalities.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; cattle markets; sustainable livelihoods; local governments; poverty; local economic development

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.