Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Effectiveness of Communication Interventions in Obstetrics – A Systematic Review

Version 1 : Received: 23 December 2020 / Approved: 24 December 2020 / Online: 24 December 2020 (07:59:04 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lippke, S.; Derksen, C.; Keller, F.M.; Kötting, L.; Schmiedhofer, M.; Welp, A. Effectiveness of Communication Interventions in Obstetrics—A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2616. Lippke, S.; Derksen, C.; Keller, F.M.; Kötting, L.; Schmiedhofer, M.; Welp, A. Effectiveness of Communication Interventions in Obstetrics—A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2616.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2616
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18052616

Abstract

(1) Background: Obstetric work requires good communication, which can be trained in interventions targeting health care providers and pregnant women/ patients. This systematic review aims to aggregate the current state of research on communication interventions in obstetrics. (2) Methods: Using the PICOS scheme, studies published in peer-reviewed journals in English or German between 2000 and 2020 were searched. Out of 7,018 results, 71 studies were included in this synthesis and evaluated using the Oxford Level of Evidence Scale. (3) Results: 63 studies, including a communication component, revealed a positive effect on different proximal outcomes (i.e., communication skills). Three studies evaluating the effect of communication training on distal performance indicators (i.e., patient safety) proved to be beneficial to some extent. Most studies included different groups at the same time; those addressing health care providers were more common than those with students (61 vs. 12). Expectant mothers were targeted only in 9 studies. Overall, the evidence level of studies was low (only 11 RCTs), with 24 studies evidence level of I-II, 35 of III, and 10 of IV. (4) Conclusions: Communication training should be applied more often to improve communication of staff, students, and pregnant women, and thereby improve patient safety.

Keywords

communication; patient safety; obstetrics; midwifery; intervention; training; interprofessional; learning

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.