Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Urban Retail Systems: Studying the Interactional Activities and Social Sustainability

Version 1 : Received: 3 November 2020 / Approved: 4 November 2020 / Online: 4 November 2020 (10:10:26 CET)

How to cite: Baghaee, S.; Aram, F.; Band, S.S.; Mosavi, A. Urban Retail Systems: Studying the Interactional Activities and Social Sustainability. Preprints 2020, 2020110186 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0186.v1). Baghaee, S.; Aram, F.; Band, S.S.; Mosavi, A. Urban Retail Systems: Studying the Interactional Activities and Social Sustainability. Preprints 2020, 2020110186 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0186.v1).

Abstract

Retails and shopping centers have become essential to today’s lifestyle. Furthermore, as modern shopping venues, retail centers' social role contributes to its popularity and profitability. The social motive of customers for shopping is beyond acquiring their crucial purchases. These advantages favor retail centers and improve the level of social sustainability and its relevant concepts. Given that relatively little study has been studied on the impact of retail centers' social role as places for interactional and recreational activities on customers' behavior in these centers and its relation to social sustainability. Two hypotheses were raised that show the effect of time travel duration and shop variety on increasing the percentage of users who spend their leisure time and recreational activities in two analogous retail centers. The result of research regarding the first hypothesis reveals that there is an interaction between time travel duration and shoppers' motivation. Furthermore, the results revealed that half of both retail center goers who spend more than 10 minutes to arrive at the retail centers prefer to do leisure activities and browsing than shopping. Therefore, the majority of individuals are from further distances, indicating longer trips can be one of the factors for willing to spend more leisure time and recreational activities. The second hypothesis reveals that shop variety can be one of the main reasons for attracting users to spend their leisure time and browse in both retail centers. There is a significant correlation between shop variety and customers’ motivation.

Subject Areas

Retail centers; interactional activities; recreational activities; urban social sustainability

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