Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Head and Neck Cancers

Version 1 : Received: 2 November 2020 / Approved: 3 November 2020 / Online: 3 November 2020 (15:14:13 CET)

How to cite: Frejborg, E.; Salo, T.; Salem, A. Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Head and Neck Cancers. Preprints 2020, 2020110165 Frejborg, E.; Salo, T.; Salem, A. Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Head and Neck Cancers. Preprints 2020, 2020110165

Abstract

The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potent enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PG), including PGE2, a key mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. Importantly, COX-2 is activated in response to inflammatory stimuli, where it is also believed to promote the development and progression of head and neck cancers (HNC). COX-2 can mediate its protumorigenic effect through various mechanisms such as inducing cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and suppressing the host’s immune response. Furthermore, COX-2 can induce the production of vascular endothelial growth factors, hence promoting angiogenesis. Indeed, the ability of COX-2 inhibitors to selectively restrict the proliferation of tumor cells and mediating apoptosis provides promising therapeutic targets for cancer patients. Thus, in this comprehensive review, we summarized the reported differential expression patterns of COX-2 in different stages of head and neck carcinogenesis—from potentially premalignant lesions to invasive carcinomas. Furthermore, we examined the available meta-analysis evidence for COX-2 role in the carcinogenesis of HNC. Finally, further understanding of the biological processes of COX-2 and its role in orchestrating cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis may give therapeutically beneficial insight to develop the management plan of HNC patients and improve their clinical outcomes.

Subject Areas

cyclooxygenase-2; head and neck cancers; head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; prostaglandins; inflammation; carcinogenesis; potentially premalignant lesions.

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.